by Gamer Dimensions in
Hystory Informative
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Hi everyone Sorry for uploading this post late the thing is that there was a delay. Today we are going to do something different from other posts. After a lot of research, I found and understood the history of video games and that’s why today we are going to see: Evolution of video games part 1 (1958-2000)! Feel free to leave a like and a comment to show your support also if you have a video game you will like to know about leave it in the comments. Sooooo… Let’s begin!

1958: The first video game:

In October 1958, Physicist William Higinbotham invented what is thought to be the first video game. It was a very simple tennis game, similar to the classic 1970s video game Pong, and it was quite a hit at a Brookhaven National Laboratory open house.
The instrumentation group had a small analogue machine that could display various curves, including the path of a bouncing ball, on an oscilloscope. It took Higinbotham only a couple of hours to conceive the idea of a tennis game, and only a few days to put together the essential pieces. Having worked on displays for radar systems and many other electronic devices, Higinbotham had no trouble designing the simple game display. Higinbotham made some drawings, and blueprints were drawn up. Engineer Robert Dvorak spent about two weeks building the game. After a little debugging, the first video game was ready for its presentation. They called the game Tennis for Two.

tennis for two | hbar's page

1962: Spacewar! a boost for initial video games: Spacewar! is a space combat video game developed in 1962 by Steve Russell in collaboration with Martin Graetz, Wayne Wiitanen, Bob Saunders, Steve Piner, and others. It was written for the newly installed DEC PDP-1 minicomputer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After its initial creation, Spacewar! was expanded further by other students and employees of universities in the area, including Dan Edwards and Peter Samson. It was also spread to many of the few dozen installations of the PDP-1 computer, making Spacewar! the first known video game to be played at various computer installations. The game features two spaceships, “the needle” and “the wedge”, engaged in a dogfight while manoeuvring in the gravity well of a star. Both ships are controlled by human players. Each ship has limited weaponry and fuel for manoeuvring, and the ships remain in motion even when the player is not accelerating. Flying near the star to provide a gravity assist was a common tactic. Ships are destroyed when they crash with a torpedo, the star, or each other. At any time, the player can engage a hyperspace feature to move to a new and random location on the screen, though in some versions each use has an increasing chance of destroying the ship instead. The game was initially controlled with switches on the PDP-1, though Bob Saunders built an early gamepad to reduce the difficulty and awkwardness of controlling the game.

Spacewar! is one of the most important and influential games in the early history of video games. It was extremely popular in the small programming community in the 1960s and the public domain code was widely ported and recreated at other computer systems at the time, especially after computer systems with monitors became more widespread towards the end of the decade. It has also been recreated in more modern programming languages for PDP-1 emulators. It directly inspired many other electronic games, such as the first commercial arcade video games, Galaxy Game and Computer Space (1971), and later games such as Asteroids (1979). In 2007, Spacewar! was named to a list of the ten most important video games of all time, which formed the start of the game canon at the Library of Congress.

Lyle Bickley explains the PDP-1 (and we play the original Spacewar ...
Spacewar! gameplay

1972: Pong: Pong is a table tennis sports game featuring simple two-dimensional graphics, manufactured by Atari and originally released in 1972. It was one of the earliest arcade video games and created by Allan Alcorn as a training exercise assigned to him by Atari co-founder Nolan Bushnell. Bushnell based the game’s concept on an electronic ping-pong game included in the Magnavox Odyssey, the first home video game console. In response, Magnavox later sued Atari for patent infringement. Bushnell and Atari co-founder Ted Dabney were surprised by the quality of Alcorn’s work and decided to manufacture the game.

Pong was the first commercially successful video game, and it helped to establish the video game industry along with the Magnavox Odyssey. Soon after its release, several companies began producing games that closely mimicked its gameplay. Eventually, Atari’s competitors released new types of video games that deviated from Pong‘s original format to varying degrees, and this, in turn, led Atari to encourage its staff to move beyond Pong, as well and to produce more innovative games themselves.

Atari has released several sequels to Pong that built upon the original’s gameplay by adding new features. During the 1975 Christmas season, Atari released a home version of Pong exclusively through Sears retail stores. The home version was also a commercial success and led to numerous clones. The game has been remade on numerous home and portable platforms following its release. Pong is part of the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., due to its cultural impact. Pong is a two-dimensional sports game that simulates table tennis. The player controls an in-game paddle by moving it vertically across the left or right side of the screen. They can compete against another player controlling a second paddle on the opposing side. Players use the paddles to hit a ball back and forth. The goal is for each player to reach eleven points before the opponent; points are earned when one fails to return the ball to the other.

A vertical rectangular wooden structure with a visual display unit embedded in the front side.
A Pong machine the video game is a representation of a game of table tennis.

1982: The ATARI 2600: The Atari 2600, originally branded as the Atari Video Computer System or Atari VCS for short until November 1982, is a home video game console from Atari, Inc. Released on September 11, 1977, it is credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor-based hardware and games stored on ROM cartridges (a format first used with the Fairchild Channel F in 1976) instead of dedicated hardware with games physically built into the unit. 2600 was bundled with two joystick controllers, a conjoined pair of paddle controllers, and a game cartridge: initially Combat, and later Pac-Man.

The Atari VCS launched with nine simple, low-resolution games in 2 KiB cartridges. The system found its killer game with its version of Taito’s Space Invaders in 1980 and became widely successful, leading to the creation of Activision and other third-party game developers as well as competition from home console manufacturers Mattel and Coleco. By the end of its primary lifecycle in 1983–84, games for 2600 were using more than four times the ROM of the launch titles with significantly more advanced visuals and gameplay than the system was designed for, such as Pitfall! and its scrolling sequel Pitfall II: Lost Caverns.

Atari invested heavily in two games for 2600, Pac-Man and E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, the latter being a commercial failure that contributed to the video game crash of 1983 which ended the market relevance of 2600. Warner sold off the home console division of Atari to Commodore CEO Jack Tramiel. In 1986, the new Atari Corporation under Tramiel released a lower-cost version of the 2600 and the backwards-compatible Atari 7800, but these were not sufficient to turn things around, and finally, it was Nintendo that led the recovery of the industry. Atari eventually stopped production of the Atari 2600 on January 1, 1992. Across the system’s lifetime, an estimated 30 million units were sold.

Atari 2600 2 Player Combat game System Pak For Sale | DKOldies
The ATARI 2600 and the ATARI 7800
Atari 7800 Console with 10 Games (con imágenes) | Video juego ...

SO I hope you enjoyed this post ! Feel free to leave ideas and leave like as I did a Lot of research for this!

Bye!

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